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Bolting at Dumplington Hill, Raymond NH
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Jul 17, 2012
Screaming Yellow Zonkers
Suck it, you'll probrably get to use some of the hangers...

Take'em off. Pound'em in (hopefully) and epoxy over. Done and done. Soon case, Soon.
nhclimber
From Newmarket, NH
Joined Apr 12, 2007
1,823 points
Jul 18, 2012
I have had some luck TAPPING back an forth on Rawl studs, then pulling with the BRUTE.. my 36" bar. Not so good with the 5 peice, they break.

Good luck
john strand
From southern colo
Joined May 22, 2008
2,259 points
Sep 24, 2012
Just heard about this forum from a friend and thought I'd chime in with my two cents since I started climbing at the Dump with Mack Johnson around 1987/88. I learned to climb from Mack in 1986 and have been a climber ever since. My first lead ever happened at the Dump, a short 5.7/8 (?) flake way over on the left side somewhere, left of the pinnacle.
Being a new climber and having Mack as a mentor in the mid 80's, ethics were very important and an essential part of my climbing education. How you did something (style) was equally as important as what you did (grade). Your style said something about you as a climber, look at how well Base is thought of and respected on this post as an example. He has earned that through his actions not by what he did (which was equally impressive ).
The no bolting ethos was all Mack. Before he moved away to Washington State he made me (and others) promise to never bolt here. For the remainder of my time in NH (1993) I upheld that promise. We TR many first ascents up to 5.12 and led many routes that were hard to protect and or run out including Stone Zoo. I belayed Mack on one of his ascents.
The other part that this no bolting ethos did was leave future generations an opportunity to have their own adventures on these pristine cliffs. To look at something with a fresh set of eyes, to make your own. We knew we were leaving gems on the table. I love that. I'd love to see all the cool lines I never saw, being climbed now by this generation of strong climbers. That is how it should be. (I have pictures of Waimea with zero bolts on it, how weird is that?!)
Hearing about natural lines getting bolted I find disturbing to say the least. Bolting lines that accept natural gear is never ok (in my opinion). However, knowing how funky getting anchors in can be, I personally have no problem with TR anchors being installed.
Getting off of my soap box, I'm sure it sounds like I'm anti bolts, but that couldn't further from the truth- I love sport climbing (just bought a new drill this Spring for the cliffs around my home in Bozeman, MT.).
I'm not a NH resident anymore and I certainly have given up any ownership (implied or otherwise) to the goings on at the Dump. I would like to challenge those that climb there to look at it through Mack's eyes. A place that can teach us a lot about our climbing, challenge us to solve problems with a different set of tools we didn't know we had and to have fun.
Thanks to all those that are looking after it. I have pictures from the 80's and 90's maybe I'll post them.
I miss NH.
Rich Searle
Rich Searle
Joined Sep 24, 2012
30 points
Sep 26, 2012
Rumney
Unfortunately bolt wars seem to be breaking out with some regularity in the NE. mountainproject.com/v/too-many...

This will continue to be the case as gyms grow larger, more gym climbers head outdoors and expect to replicate what they experience in the gym. [at least that's my best theory as to what's happening]

Rap anchors are typically a very good means of helping develop an area (assuming they're legal/authorized by land managers). It's win / win for climber and ecology.

Bolting traditionally is an "only when absolutely necessary" practice (as previously stated). It's probably THE hot button topic among climbers, so anyone going out and arbitrarily bolting is either completely disconnected from the remainder of the climbing community (unlikely) or just doing whatever the hell they want (most likely).

While some might not care now, they will care if access to their favorite crag is revoked by land managers. Reality check.
Kevin Heckeler
From Upstate New York
Joined Jul 10, 2010
1,269 points
Administrator
Sep 26, 2012
A Very Not Snowy Christmas...
Rich Searle wrote:
Just heard about this forum from a friend and thought I'd chime in with my two cents since I started climbing at the Dump with Mack Johnson around 1987/88. I learned to climb from Mack in 1986 and have been a climber ever since. My first lead ever happened at the Dump, a short 5.7/8 (?) flake way over on the left side somewhere, left of the pinnacle. Being a new climber and having Mack as a mentor in the mid 80's, ethics were very important and an essential part of my climbing education. How you did something (style) was equally as important as what you did (grade). Your style said something about you as a climber, look at how well Base is thought of and respected on this post as an example. He has earned that through his actions not by what he did (which was equally impressive ). The no bolting ethos was all Mack. Before he moved away to Washington State he made me (and others) promise to never bolt here. For the remainder of my time in NH (1993) I upheld that promise. We TR many first ascents up to 5.12 and led many routes that were hard to protect and or run out including Stone Zoo. I belayed Mack on one of his ascents. The other part that this no bolting ethos did was leave future generations an opportunity to have their own adventures on these pristine cliffs. To look at something with a fresh set of eyes, to make your own. We knew we were leaving gems on the table. I love that. I'd love to see all the cool lines I never saw, being climbed now by this generation of strong climbers. That is how it should be. (I have pictures of Waimea with zero bolts on it, how weird is that?!) Hearing about natural lines getting bolted I find disturbing to say the least. Bolting lines that accept natural gear is never ok (in my opinion). However, knowing how funky getting anchors in can be, I personally have no problem with TR anchors being installed. Getting off of my soap box, I'm sure it sounds like I'm anti bolts, but that couldn't further from the truth- I love sport climbing (just bought a new drill this Spring for the cliffs around my home in Bozeman, MT.). I'm not a NH resident anymore and I certainly have given up any ownership (implied or otherwise) to the goings on at the Dump. I would like to challenge those that climb there to look at it through Mack's eyes. A place that can teach us a lot about our climbing, challenge us to solve problems with a different set of tools we didn't know we had and to have fun. Thanks to all those that are looking after it. I have pictures from the 80's and 90's maybe I'll post them. I miss NH. Rich Searle


+1000 for an awesome post
Morgan Patterson
Joined Oct 13, 2009
8,415 points
Sep 26, 2012
me on into another world pawtuckaway
Rich, I would personaly like to thank you for your post. Its great to hear from someone that actually climbed at The Dump during its hay day and with the developers of the area.

Cheers,

Christopher J. Gagne
Christopher Gagne
From Dover
Joined Nov 20, 2007
820 points
Sep 26, 2012
Christopher, it was your post that motivated me to respond, so thanks to you!
I know its just this tiny area in the scope of NH climbing, but growing up in Londonderry, it was really important being so close. Thanks for caring about it!
If I can help in the future please let me know.
Rich
Rich Searle
Joined Sep 24, 2012
30 points
Sep 26, 2012
Mack Johnson
Mack Johnson


RS seconding on the FA of Can the Jingo 7/31/88
RS seconding on the FA of Can the Jingo 7/31/88


2nd ascent of 5.11+/ 12- don't remember the name. ...
2nd ascent of 5.11+/ 12-
don't remember the name. Right of pinnacle, technical arete to dyno.


crux reach to horizontal.
crux reach to horizontal.


dyno.  Hockey mullet, Kinnaloa/ Jrat harness, ASOL...
dyno. Hockey mullet, Kinnaloa/ Jrat harness, ASOLO Runouts, some crazy guatemalan pants(?) ahh 1990.


right hand variation. traverse to horizontal from ...
right hand variation. traverse to horizontal from the right, dyno finish.
Rich Searle
Joined Sep 24, 2012
30 points
Administrator
Sep 26, 2012
The Hammer
The mullet would still probably fit in in that part of NH! M Sprague
From New England
Joined Nov 9, 2006
5,453 points
Sep 26, 2012
me on into another world pawtuckaway
Rich, The last 4 photos look like they go to the route

Crimpin 5.12- (TR)
Climb's the blunt outside corner right of the Hypomanic chimney. Move up and right past knobs, the lunge to the ledge.
Christopher Gagne
From Dover
Joined Nov 20, 2007
820 points
Sep 26, 2012
that sounds right. We also climbed into that dyno from the right as a variation- easier. Rich Searle
Joined Sep 24, 2012
30 points


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