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By Marc H
From Lafayette, CO
Dec 2, 2012
The Cathedral Spires in RMNP, left to right: Stiletto, Sharkstooth, Forbidden Tower, Petit Grepon, The Saber, The Foil, The Moon & The Jackknife.

Mike Belu wrote:
^^^ how do u bring up the second on multipitch?


The same way people did in the 60s, 70, 80s, and most of the 90s.

The the OP:

Just pick up a helmet, belay device, and a few trustworthy partners. The rest will come in time depending on which climbing discipline you like the most. Beat the shit outta your partners' gear before you invest in your own. :-)


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Dec 2, 2012
El Chorro

Mike Belu wrote:
^^^ how do u bring up the second on multipitch? I'd think for the $, the atc guide (or reverso) would be the best value.


Just belay off my harness. If I need to I redirect the rope through a biner on the masterpoint but I'd say 9/10 times I just belay off my harness. Autoblock devices are great in some situations but they are certainly not essential by any definition of the word.


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By Sure-man
From Boone, NC/ S.F.
Dec 2, 2012
On Las Aguajas with TW0 summit in the background

Like what was said before; if you continue climbing in NC your gonna want to get into trad climbing. Thats where all the fun is in my opinion. Linville Gorge, Table Rock is a great place for easy multipitch trad, but have someone take you up first.

Im surprised im the first to say this, but buy a couple feet of 6 mm cord for a prussik. Tie it in a loop with a double fisherman's knot, put it on a locker, and learn how it works. Its cheap, lightweight, and can do many magical things. I think it is a staple for a climber's rack. Have fun!

-Brett


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By Ryan Williams
Administrator
From London (sort of)
Dec 2, 2012
El Chorro

Has anyone mentioned a nut tool? I hate it when people don't have one. Any cheap one will do.


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By doligo
Dec 2, 2012
Jose Cuervo Fruitcups dirtbag style

ErikaNW wrote:
3rd (or 4th, 5th?) to helmet and belay device.


If you plan on following multi-pitch trad:
3. 48" sewn nylon sling to use as a personal tether, if you don't want to invest in a factory made PAS - don't buy a daisy chain (!!!)
4. nut tool
5. couple more locking biners and 1-2 sewn 24" slings - to use as a gear sling, make an improvised foot loop etc.
6. two 5 or 6 mm cords around 28" tied into prusik cords.


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By The Maverick
Dec 6, 2012

ErikaNW wrote:
3rd (or 4th, 5th?) to helmet and belay device. I would also invest in a rope (60m or 70m depending on what crags you are hitting) - simply because ropes wear out and it is a really nice gesture to share that expense with your climbing partners/mentors, even if you aren't leading yet, rather than relying on their gear all of the time. Have fun and climb safe!


Erika,

You are so right. That is a great gesture. I do feel guilty for always using my climbing partners' ropes.

Thank you for that advice. Never thought about that.


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By The Maverick
Dec 6, 2012

Brett Sherman wrote:
Like what was said before; if you continue climbing in NC your gonna want to get into trad climbing. Thats where all the fun is in my opinion. Linville Gorge, Table Rock is a great place for easy multipitch trad, but have someone take you up first. Im surprised im the first to say this, but buy a couple feet of 6 mm cord for a prussik. Tie it in a loop with a double fisherman's knot, put it on a locker, and learn how it works. Its cheap, lightweight, and can do many magical things. I think it is a staple for a climber's rack. Have fun! -Brett


Your right about that Prusik cord. It is magical! I am still amazed by that tiny piece of cord and the amount of tension it can sustain.

I think we will do Table Rock next. My friends are expert climbers. They are letting me pick the location and they chose the easy routes for me to learn. Funny, they are a couple. One loves sport climbing and the other loves trad. Neither is a huge fan of the opposite. This works great for me. I get to learn it all.


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By The Maverick
Dec 6, 2012

tsmartt wrote:
here's a useful link about picking climbing shoes super topo has a collection of gear reviews that could be helpful. who knows, the 5.10 coyotes may be excellent shoes, but the day may come when you're looking for something else. many climbers have multiple pairs of shoes. i'm a big fan of the la sportiva miura lace ups, a shoe that feels at home on just about any terrain. for quickdraws, the black diamond positrons are very nice for the price range they're in. jury is out on the big bros. tri cams are really cool, but i rarely use mine, could just be due to where i climb. i don't often see hexes used either, sold mine a few years ago and haven't missed them. some may scoff at this, but a couple quicklinks from a hardware store can be really handy for all kinds of things, as well as lots of prusik cord. a stick clip is very cheap, and easy to make. painters pole and a small clamp. hope i was at least somewhat helpful, have fun climbing!!



I have heard, in theory, a climber should get a new pair of shoes every year. What are you thoughts on this? By the way, thanks for the links. Very handy!


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By Jake Jones
From Richmond, VA
Dec 6, 2012
Me and the offspring walking back to the car after a day of cragging.

Ericka Heath wrote:
I have heard, in theory, a climber should get a new pair of shoes every year. What are you thoughts on this? By the way, thanks for the links. Very handy!


How often you get shoes depends almost solely on your climbing (other factors being type of rock, etc). When you're just starting, your footwork will suck and the rubber on your shoes will show it. You'll burn through them fast. Get something comfortable that you can spend lots of time in (and that is cheap). One pair a year for a beginner seems a little bit hopeful. My first year I wore through the toes on one pair, had them resoled, and bought another pair. YMMV.


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By Scott McMahon
From Boulder, CO
Dec 6, 2012
Bocan

Ericka Heath wrote:
I have heard, in theory, a climber should get a new pair of shoes every year. What are you thoughts on this?!


Sounds like something an outdoor store that sells climbing shoes would say.

Resole shoes when they need it, buy new shoes when you need them. If you buy into the commercial hype of what you need, you will end up with closets full of unneeded gear.

Also you don't need to change your car oil every 3000 miles.


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By Maurice Chaunders
Dec 6, 2012
Colombian Crack

As far as the ATC vs the ATC Guide, I think you might get yourself into more trouble with the guide (or Reverso), than without. Especially if you are new and maybe you decide it's your turn to take some newbies on their first climb, though it could be on any climb any time. If your partner gets stuck or injured while you are belaying them from above, your solutions all involve advanced techniques. You may have to lower them, haul them up, or fix the rope, escape the belay and rappel to them. Lowering is the easiest, if appropriate, but even that requires skill and knowledge (and a prussik is helpful). I think it's best to start with a basic ATC and then when you move into multi pitch, you'll love the ATC guide, and by then you'll have had the opportunities to learn the advanced techniques.


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By wivanoff
Dec 6, 2012
High Exposure

mike seaman wrote:
As far as the ATC vs the ATC Guide, I think you might get yourself into more trouble with the guide (or Reverso), than without. Especially if you are new and maybe you decide it's your turn to take some newbies on their first climb, though it could be on any climb any time. If your partner gets stuck or injured while you are belaying them from above, your solutions all involve advanced techniques. You may have to lower them, haul them up, or fix the rope, escape the belay and rappel to them. Lowering is the easiest, if appropriate, but even that requires skill and knowledge (and a prussik is helpful). I think it's best to start with a basic ATC and then when you move into multi pitch, you'll love the ATC guide, and by then you'll have had the opportunities to learn the advanced techniques.


Or you could just use the ATC-Guide as a regular ATC. Use it in guide mode only when needed.


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By Locker
From Yucca Valley, CA
Dec 6, 2012
...

Totally agree with this post:

"experienced people to go with over and over again ... thats what you need ...

dont bother buying anything for the first while until you figure out in real life, not on the intrawebs, what you should buy ..."



Really GOOD advice...



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By Spam
Dec 8, 2012

hey E, first of all nice work! I love your pictures so keep them coming.
on topic: your beginner gear selection should include the following
comfortable shoes
harness
belay device
PAS
3 lockers
chalk bag
helmet
water bottle
crag pack 30 l volume
headlamp
tape
12 sport type quickdraws
20 ft of webbing 2" or cordalette 9mm
thin packable windbreaker jacket
low rize light approach shoes
10.5 70 m dynamic climbing rope

needless to say reliable mentor(s)/climbing buddies the more the merrier!!! Prize experience and temperament above the grades (they state) they climb.

wow you rock!!!!


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By Medic741
From Pittsford, New York
Dec 8, 2012
When I was a bum at Frey

No one mentioned this yet and it's really simple.

A Prussik for backing up rappelds, learning skills like ascending ropes and the like. Should carry one on every non tr climb


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By Dan Felix
Dec 8, 2012

Spam, curious why you see the need for 2" webbing when the 'standard' has been 1" for ages. And (or) a 9 mm cordelette? Again, why so big? I may be a rock noob, but I certainly am not new to ropes- a 10.5 mm rope is too thick in my opinion, length notwithstanding, 10-10.2 is about as thick as I would ever even consider unless it was specifically for toproping.


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By Spam
Dec 8, 2012

Dan Felix wrote:
Spam, curious why you see the need for 2" webbing when the 'standard' has been 1" for ages. And (or) a 9 mm cordelette? Again, why so big? I may be a rock noob, but I certainly am not new to ropes- a 10.5 mm rope is too thick in my opinion, length notwithstanding, 10-10.2 is about as thick as I would ever even consider unless it was specifically for toproping.

NoOb abuse, toprope abuse....etc
As for the rope diameter the thicker ropes are less stretchy so since E is gonna tr a bunch and hang a lot it will make it easier for her not to bounce around....


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By Unassigned User
Dec 9, 2012

Just buy everything!! You are probably going to want some ice gear and def a valley giant or two.


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