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Advice for climbing area in Alps or Dolomites?
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By MealyM
From Frankfurt
Feb 10, 2014

I recently moved to Germany and am not very familiar with the climbing scene here. I'd like to drive south to the Alps or Dolomites and take a weeklong rock climbing trip this summer but have no idea where to start. Any advice on a good place to set up shop based on the below (ideal) criteria?

- Longer, moderate, multipitch routes (6-10 pitches, 5.5-5.9)
- Approach short enough that routes are day trippable
- Not too expensive (I'm used to European prices though)
- English guidebook. Barring that German.

Thanks!


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By David Coley
From UK
Feb 10, 2014

Email Jim Titt (who posts on here). Great guy, knows his stuff, and lives in Germany.


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By Mark E Dixon
From Sprezzatura, Someday
Feb 10, 2014
Sure, I can belay

Tre Cima or Sella Pass in Dolomites.
Grimsell Pass in Switzerland
Wilde Kaiser in Austria

If you can't find info online LMK and I'll elaborate, but hard to type left handed.


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By manuel rangel
From Tempe, Arizona
Feb 11, 2014
Trying to redpoint The Ugly 11c; steeper than it looks and the rock is scary in spots but good enough.

I spent time in Dolomites last Sept. We climbed routes you may enjoy in Sella Pass and surrounding crags. The place we stayed in at Canazei was cheap and the guidebook is in english. Although it is the 100 classic climbs book and a tad outdated, not much has changed.

I also found that the easy climbs were a bit runout but ok; and on the Trenker Crack (Sella Tower) I wish I had brought a #4 camalot. Also the Marikante (long 5.7 finishing under the cable car). This route is ok if you follow the line; get a bit off and you are on your own.


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By IvanKrause
From San Francisco
Feb 14, 2014
Yosemite

Hi Mealy, I am planning a climbing trip to Dolomites in September. Will be traveling from US and are looking for climbing partner. Would you be interested to meet there and climb some classics? Ivan


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By MealyM
From Frankfurt
Feb 17, 2014

Thanks for all the advice everyone! This gives me a lot to focus my research on. I'll try to post something afterwards if that is helpful for others planning.

Ivan - would love to meet up but not sure if I'll be able to get away. I already have some travel planned in September and the Dolomites are a bit far for a weekend trip. PM me when your trip gets closer and I'll let you know if I can get away.


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By kenr
Feb 17, 2014

manuel rangel wrote:
Although it is the 100 classic climbs book and a tad outdated, not much has changed.

Well I guess the rock hasn't changed much, but the climbing community's ideas about a good way to do certain climbs has changed in the intervening decades.

I definitely suggest purchasing the most recent German-language guidebooks - (and use "100 Classics" only as a source of ideas).

My (German) partner and I got into trouble following the diagram + description in the "100 classics" book. Fortunately we conferred with a German party who showed us their diagram from the latest German guidebook -- and suddenly everything made sense and we finished the climb easily.

Ken


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By mrcn
Feb 18, 2014

Hi Mealy
prices in Dolomites differs greatly with season. Early september or late june may be great for climbing and much cheaper.

You can check www.ideamontagna.it/librimontagna/catalogolibrimontagna.asp for "mid grade trad rock" guidebooks in english, but route descriptions are mostly text not diagrams. I would rather suggest Mauro Bernardi's books in german from athesia "klettern im .. und umgebung. Great diagrams and photos + very short text description of approach and descent.
There's also www.versantesud.it/en/shop/arco-walls/ previously called Sarca Valls. It's guidebook for multipitch routes in Arco region. Great for early/late season or bad weather in Dolomites

For first time in Dolomites I would suggest Cortina. It's not that expensive off season. Cinque Torri for warm up and later you can move to walls around Falzarego and Valparola pass.
Sella pass is nice too.


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By kenr
Feb 19, 2014

mrcn wrote:
I would rather suggest Mauro Bernardi's books in german from athesia "klettern im .. und umgebung.


Yes.


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By fossana
From Boulder, CO
Feb 19, 2014
West Overhang

+1 on Wilder Kaiser

I put up an area page here based on what I found last Oct, although there is additional detailed info on summitpost (referenced on page). The guys that own the related area pages on summitpost are great resources. That reminds me, I need to put up an Ellmauer Halt page.

The topos/guides I found are mostly in German, but you can find free topos online for the more popular routes. I saw signs for a campground, but it wasn't open when I was there.


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By Dan Flynn
Administrator
From MA
Mar 3, 2014
5b upper pitch in the clouds

Daytrips might be a stretch, but check out the Val Bergel -- Cassin Route on Piz Badille was one of my favorite climbs in Switzerland when I lived there. The northeast ridge is more moderate and also can be done in a day. Many more possibilities on both Swizt and Italian sides of the border; can camp or stay in the huts.

For (mostly) shorter routes with one basecamp, go to Salbithütte for a week, and climb alpine granite to your heart's content. Staying at the hut will be expensive, but you can find ways to make it cheaper.


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