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'Knots' in the School of Rock

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Rock Climbing Photo: The munter hitch by Keith Svihovec
How to Use a Munter Hitch
In 2005, I was lucky enough to have Mr. Werner Munter, the father of the Avalanche Reduction Method, as my avalanche-course examiner in Switzerland. With his Lennon glasses and straight grey hair and beard, he’d impersonate an avalanche’s characteristic Whumph!by spread...
Caroline George at Climbing Magazine
Rock Climbing Photo: Preferred rapelling knots by Chris Philpot
Preferred Knots for Rappelling
As a mountain guide, two questions I’m often asked are: 1) What knot do you use to join two ropes for rappels? and 2) Which knot do you use to tie the end of the ropes for a backup? Preferred rapelling knots by Chris Philpot 1. Joi...
Rob Hess at Climbing Magazine
Rock Climbing Photo: Step 1
The Butterfly Knot
This is the preferred knot for tying into the middle of a rope, as you’d do on a three-person rope team. (Clip into the loop with a locking carabiner.) This knot is also great for rappelling when your ropes are too short. Step 1 ...
Climbing Magazine
Rock Climbing Photo: Bolted toprope anchor setup by Chris Philpot
Bolted Toprope Anchors
Once you start venturing outside the gym to pull on real rock, you or your climbing partner might not be quite ready to tie into the sharp end, so it’s essential to know how to set up a solid anchor for toproping. Many climbs have two bolts (or chains or rings attached t...
Julie Ellison at Climbing Magazine
Rock Climbing Photo: Fig 1 Untie your cordelette by Supercorn
Build an Anchor in Poor Rock
How many pieces do you need for a traditional anchor? Most climbers don’t have time to blink before they answer this question. But if you answered “three,” you’re wrong. An anchor takes as many pieces as it needs based on rock quality, positioning, angle, and other fa...
Jason D. Martin at Climbing Magazine
Rock Climbing Photo: Alpine anchor
Alpine Anchors
In the mountains or on long rock routes, anchor efficiency can be the difference between a comfortable finish and a forced bivouac. Using a cordelette to equalize an anchor is easy and strong, but it takes a lot of extra time to set up, and even longer to break down. Ther...
Ian Nicholson at Climbing Magazine
Rock Climbing Photo: Take the whip, take the whip!—ooh, but not like t...
50 Ways to Flail
I've been climbing for more than 15 years, and the mistakes I've made cover the gamut. My knot came partly untied while I was climbing at Joshua Tree; I've threaded my belay device backward; partway up El Capitan, my partner once completely unclipped me from a belay. Wors...
Laura Snider at Climbing Magazine
Rock Climbing Photo: Bunny Ears Step 1
Bunny Ears: The Best Climbing Knot You've Never Heard Of
Whether you’re doing a three-pitch free climb or a 3000-foot big wall, multi-pitch climbing is all about efficiency. Every little time-saving action, every slightly more streamlined step, adds up to saving you precious hours—it’s the difference between climbing the las...
Andrew Bisharat at Backcountry

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